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How to Correct Legacy Document Problems with Fonts

Posted · Category: Information

Modern browsers like Internet Explorer 10 and 9 introduced sub-pixel font positioning as part of its hardware-accelerated rendering of HTML5 content. That was an important step into the future as it enabled zoom-independent text metrics—an important characteristic when touch gestures like pinch-zoom are part of the browsing experience on Windows 8 touch-enabled devices. This article shows how easy it is to help your fonts look better across many browsers by declaring Standards Mode.

Zoom Example: Legacy vs. Standards Modes

Below are side-by-side comparisons showing text from a popular news site in 8 and 10 document modes at 100% and 150%. Note the especially poor letter spacing between some letters in the 150% 8 mode example (upper right).

optical-zooming

Move to Standards Today

The best fix for this behavior is to move your pages Standards Mode. Compat Inspector is a valuable tool to help you migrate to IE9 or IE10 mode. Compat Inspector identifies potential issues and offers steps you can take to resolve them. In general, the HTML, CSS, and JavaScript markup and code you use with other browsers will work great in IE10 once any browser detection is replaced with feature detection and vendor-specific CSS prefixes are updated to include -ms- or unprefixed versions. Modernizr is a JavaScript library that can help with these issues. Read the rest of this entry »

Google Maps Santa Tracker Features Latest Technology

Posted · Category: Information, License Free

Google Maps Santa Tracker is created and developed by Google, with a little help from Santa’s elves. On Christmas Eve Google will be proudly showcasing a preview of Santa’s dashboard, the technology that powers his sleigh during his around-the-world journey.

Santa’s dashboard is featuring the latest and greatest in Google Maps technology and sleigh engineering, which will allow you to follow his progress around the world, and also learn a little about some of his stops along the way. You can go ahead and explore his village, you might just find some fun activities and meet some interesting elves.

santa-tracker

Requirements: -
Demo: http://www.google.com/santatracker/
License: License Free

How to Create a Windows Store app using HTML and JS

Posted · Category: Information

One of the advantages for developing Windows Store apps is that you can utilize your existing knowledge of HTML, CSS and Javascript. This tutorial teaches you how to create a simple “Hello, world” Windows Store app built for Windows using JavaScript.

In this tutorial, you learn how to:

  • Create a new project
  • Add HTML content to your start page
  • Handle touch, pen, and mouse input
  • Switch between the light and dark style sheets
  • Create your own custom styles
  • Use a Windows Library for JavaScript control

We show you how to create a Windows Store app using HTML, JavaScript, and CSS.

Note that you can also create Windows Store apps using other technologies. To write a Windows Store app using C# and Visual Basic, or C++ and XAML. For graphics-intensive apps, you can use DirectX and C++.

Getting Started

To complete this tutorial, you need Windows 8 and Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2012 for Windows 8. To download them, see Get the tools. You also need a developer license. For instructions, see Get a developer license.

Step 1: Create a new project in Visual Studio

Let’s create a new app named HelloWorld. Here’s how:

1. Launch Visual Studio Express 2012 for Windows 8. The Visual Studio Express 2012 for Windows 8 start screen appears.

2. From the File menu select New Project. The New Project dialog appears. The left pane of the dialog lets you pick the type of templates to display.

3. In the left pane, expand Installed, then expand Templates, then expand JavaScript and select the Windows Store template type. The dialog’s center pane displays a list of project templates for JavaScript.

For this tutorial, we use the Blank App template. This template creates a minimal Windows Store app that compiles and runs, but contains no user interface controls or data. We’ll add controls and data to the app over the course of these tutorials. Read the rest of this entry »

Build HTML5 using Best Practices from Atari Arcade

Posted · Category: Information

This article recently appeared on the Atari Arcade Developer Center, a collaboration by the teams at gskinner.com , Atari and Internet Explorer. It is authorized to publish on WebAppers.

Building HTML5 Games for Atari Arcade

Most HTML5 games are available in isolation so the hardware and browser can be dedicated to gameplay. But that’s not how we envisioned a modern arcade – where users could gather, play the games, challenge their friends to high-score dominance, and earn achievements. We had to rethink how we approached game development with a common set of tools.

With Atari Arcade, that game is changing. This site was designed completely in HTML5 for Internet Explorer 10 and Windows 8 touch-enabled devices – although it works great in all modern browsers. In this guide, we’ll quickly get you up and running with your own HTML5 game. The Atari Arcade SDK with CreateJS is one of the first cross-browser HTML5 game development platforms that allow you to take advantage of multi-touch capabilities more easily. The Atari Arcade SDK is just one of many options you should consider. All of the practices we share can be used with other gaming platforms in modern browsers.

In this article, we’ll provide:

  1. Steps to define and build your game
  2. An overview of the SDK’s goals and approaches
  3. Sample code showing integration
  4. Adding flair and/or pizazz
  5. Steps to test, optimize, and deploy your game

Read the rest of this entry »

How to Optimize Your Code in JavaScript

Posted · Category: Code, Information

This article recently appeared on BuildNewGames.com, a collaboration by the teams at Bocoup and Internet Explorer. It is authorized to publish on WebAppers.

At Bocoup, my colleagues and I often laze about in antique leather armchairs, sipping Mai Tais, waxing rhetoric about important issues-of-the-day including international politics and automatic semicolon insertion. One thing I find fascinating is how people working on different types of projects have different wisdom to share: best practices for jQuery plugins are different than those for Facebook apps, and tips for Backbone.js ecommerce sites may not be useful when developing real-time strategy games.

javascript-optimize

What I’d like to share in this article is some code organization tips and tricks I’ve learned while making HTML5 games. I’ve tried to keep them as generally useful as possible, but you’ll definitely get the most out of this if you make games like I do.

First I’ll discuss organizing JavaScript code into files and modules. Then I’ll talk about code sharing approaches such as component systems. Lastly I’ll share some ideas for writing data-driven code in games.

Read the rest of this entry »

A Comparison of JavaScript Physics Engines

Posted · Category: Information

In this article we will take a look at three popular Javascript physics libraries and one that is currently in development: box2dweb, Ammo.js, JigLibJS, and Cannon.js. For each one, a quick introduction will be given and then the library will be rated based on ease of use, performance, and feature set.

Though it is possible to run any of these libraries without a visual representation, that isn’t much fun, so we will set up a small environment to see the results as the simulation runs. I’ll use Three.js and its CanvasRenderer for this due to its popularity and how simple it is to use. Besides showing how the objects are interacting, this will also demonstrate how to extract scene information from each library. The scene will consist of two ramps leading down to a floor; balls will drop down onto the ramps from random locations above the scene, roll down the ramps, and land onto the floor.

javascript-physics

Setup

Our base scene that will be used in each example has two ramps which lead down to the ground. Balls will be dropped from random points above the ramps, rolling down to and then off of the ground plane. This simple scene will highlight the similarities and differences between the four libraries. Read the rest of this entry »

The Best Deals for Design Apps & Resources

Posted · Category: Information

TickitWickit.com is a popular site that retails heavily discounted bundles of high quality software, aimed at empowering the creative community on a quarterly basis. It comes with a unique concept: everything you buy earns you future discounts. Users can save 2x on every purchase by earning “tickits” – a discount you win when you make a purchase – to save up to 25% additional discounts off future purchases.

Now, they are running a Ten Everyday Promotion for the next 3 Days, they will randomly select ten lucky winners. That’s 30 winners who will get ALL the deals for free for A WHOLE YEAR. That’s 365 days of deals. You can check out their current deals.

1winner-everyhour-webappers

There are some awesome deals there like 60% off WebIconSet Deal gives you access to over 1,000 and counting of high-quality and user-friendly stock icons till the end of year 2015! 75% off Themify Deal gives you two developer themes for just $29.

design-deals

Experiments: Interactive CSS3 Lighting Effects on iPad

Posted · Category: Information, License Free

3D transforms are awesome, but they’re even cooler with lighting effects. Tom Giannattasio, working at edX which is a joint venture between MIT and Harvard focused on building an open-source platform for online education.

He has created an Interactive CSS3 Lighting Effects for iPad. The specular highlights are created with CSS gradients and masks. The cast shadow relies on box shadows and transforms. It looks best in Safari browser.

css3-lighting

Requirements: CSS3
Download Link: http://attasi.com/labs/ipad/
License: License Free

How to Create PayPal Loading Animation with CSS3

Posted · Category: Information, License Free

PayPal is a global e-commerce business allowing payments and money transfers to be made through the Internet. Online money transfers serve as electronic alternatives to paying with traditional paper methods, such as checks and money orders. Most of the websites accept PayPal payment nowadays.

I particular like the loading animation of PayPal while you are logging in. Fabrice Weinberg has recreated the PayPal Loading Animation using Pure CSS. It is absolutely mind-blowing. It’s pretty amazing what can be achieved with gradients. Take a look at it, I am sure you can learn some CSS techniques there as well.

paypal-loading-animation-css

Requirements: CSS3
Demo: http://codepen.io/FWeinb/pen/BeJLo
License: License Free

Awesome CSS3 Border Transition Effects

Posted · Category: Information, License Free

When it comes to design the key is to do more with less. Too much makes a page look cluttered, too little makes it look like you are back in the 80s. Luckily web developers can do some amazing things with CSS3 that give a page, or content within a page, that extra “pop” needed to make things stand out and look great without making the site look busy and thrown together.

Here are some CSS3 Crazy Effects with Border Transitions. Originally made by ksk1015. Pretty basic CSS3 code, but amazing output. They are pretty useful when making your image galleries look great and stand out.

css3-border-transition

Requirements: D3 Framework
Demo: http://thecodeplayer.com/walkthrough/simple-yet-amazing-css3-border…
License: License Free

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